Tag Archives: fabric

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift Bag

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift Bag

Because you needed another placemat tutorial. You were desperately looking for something else to make from all those gorgeous placemats you couldn’t pass up in the Target aisle. I got your back, friend.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagThis is EASY! Perfect for beginners for a quick project, easy enough to do the day of giving, too (guilty!). Why present a wine gift to the host/hostess in a boring gift bag when you can MAKE one that is wayyyyyy cooler?

Find yourself a lovely placemat. The one I chose has a lining on the back, but don’t fret if yours doesn’t — it isn’t necessary. Just be sure to read the notes below.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagFold your placemat in half lengthwise so the right sides are facing together.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagMeasure in 3-6 inches, start there and sew back and forth a few times, then sew down the length, turn and sew down the short end, and sew back and forth again.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift Bag

It should look like this when you’re done!

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift Bag

***Now take your scissors and cut off the fabric to the right of the seam you just made on the short end. NOTE: I did this because the existing seam was too thick with the lining. If your placemat isn’t lined, you won’t need to do this. I also forgot to take a picture. Woops. But you can see it in the next one.

Now, take your scissors and cut off the fabric to the right of the long seam you just made, just down at the bottom where it meets the short sewn end. This will just make it easier to put in the gusset on the bottom of the bag.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagGrab the bottom of the bag and squeeze it! Placemat Wine Bottle Gift Bag

Squeeze from the folded side so the bottom pops out and use your fingers to fold over the corners toward the center. They will go in about an inch or so.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagGet your needle & thread ready, and hand stitch those corners down.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagDoesn’t have to be fancy. Clearly. They won’t see this so feel free to just wing it.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagDo both sides so it looks like this!

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagTurn the bag right-side out. Isn’t she pretty?

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagDepending on the kind of ribbon you have, you may need to seal it so it doesn’t fray. Ever hear of this stuff?

Fray Check is AWESOME – I use it all the time. Perfect for ribbon ends & sealing off small bits that you don’t want to fray.

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagInsert bottle, tie a bow…

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift BagVOILA!

Placemat Wine Bottle Gift Bag

A thoughtful handmade gift to go with your pal’s favorite vino.

Enjoy! Hope your pal share’s her wine with you… :o)

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Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Infinity Scarf Tutorial

Infinity ScarfWhy buy a scarf when you can make one yourself in about 15 minutes? It is really that easy. You can use any type of fabric you like, make it as long or loopy as you like and add whatever embellishments you like. Sew much fun.

This tutorial is for an infinity scarf – you know, the circle ones you wear like a necklace? And this method creates a nice, finished tube — no exposed ends. In my example, the fabric I used measured 18×28″ and makes one loop, perfect for a simple accessory. If you want it to hang low, add length. If you want to wrap it around a few times and make a big, bold scarfy statement, add even more length (double or triple or quadruple!).

infinityfancyA Note on Fabric: Knits work best for scarves since they are stretchy and drape nicely. You can also use fancy fabrics, chiffon, etc., but they will not stretch so be mindful of that (you do need to get it over your head, you know). Regular cotton can work as well, but it is stiff (also does not stretch), and gives your scarf a totally different look. So if you want it to hang nicely, go with a knit or something lightweight and drapey. Is that a word? 🙂

The fabric I used in the tutorial is Modern Jersey from Spoonflower — it’s one of my designs, and I used only a fat quarter! They are generous with this fabric given that their fat quarter for it is 18×28″…bonus! It’s a lovely weight as well – thick, but very soft and stretchy – I absolutely love it.

A Note on Needles: If you are going to use a knit fabric, CHANGE YOUR NEEDLE. Yes, there are different needles for different types of fabric. You may not think you need to use a different needle, or you may be afraid to try to change it, but it is worth it! Trust me. It takes only a second and makes a world of difference. Just refer to your manual for instructions and make sure the flat side of the needle faces the back when you shove it in. If you need some ball point knit needles, here you go!

To make your scarf:

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Start by laying out your fabric right side up. Fold in half lengthwise, right sides together, and pin in place. Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Take your tube to the sewing machine and simply zigzag stitch all the way down the end of the tube to sew it together.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

The zigzag stitch will allow for stretching the fabric without breaking the threads.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Now reach inside to the other end and pull it through. Don’t turn it all the way right side out, just pull it towards you so you can line up the the two tube ends, one inside the other, the right sides of the fabric facing each other.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Pin around the edges to hold them together if you need (most of the time I don’t need to pin, just depends on the fabric).

If your machine has an end that comes off like mine, you’re in luck – this will be super simple. Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Start to sew the edges together – I always start where the seams line up.  Just turn the fabric as you sew, going all the way around, but STOPPING about 2 inches before the end (or the start, since it is where you started).

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

–> If your machine end doesn’t come off, that’s OK! Just work with the fabric and sew around as far as you can – you’ll have more than a 2″ gap, but that’s perfectly OK.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Reach inside and turn your scarf right side out — it will all come out, don’t worry. You’ll have a nice circle tube with a hole in it.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

Now you have two options —- hand stitch the hole closed (a ladder stitch would be great here), OR fold the edges in, pin and sew it shut on your machine. I use my machine. Everytime.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

You’ll have a small seam but that part goes underneath and sits on the back of your neck anyway — just turn it around.

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

And you’re done. Applaud yourself and wear your new scarf with pride, my crafty friend!

Infinity Scarf Tutorial by Stickelberry

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DIY Fabric Tutu

DIY Fabric Tutu

First of all, let me say I can’t take credit for this one, I saw  this pin on Pinterest, and I nearly died. THE CUTENESS!!!!

Now, you know I don’t have a girl, this is an all boy house, but I’ve been dying to make some girly things lately…. and it just so happened that one of my bestie’s daughters was turning 5.

So the timing was just perfect.

I had to do it.

tutu2

I followed the tutorial behind that pin from Create Kids Couture

She has it all figured out by age — how much elastic to cut, how many fabric strips and how long they need to be. SO EASY! Kudos and thanks to this gal for figuring it all out for us.

Since my giftee was turning 5, I cut a 20″ piece of knit elastic (3/4″ found here), and I went with  44 3×23 inch strips of these gorgeous batik prints I’ve been hanging on to for a special occasion.

batik prints

They were in a fat quarter bundle I purchased years ago, similar to these here. Confession: I bought the Batman shirt first because I’m a total nerd and decided to match the fabric to the shirt. Lucky lucky me, I had these batiks stashed away that matched just perfectly!

rotary cutter for fabric strips

For my own sanity, I used a rotary cutter to cut all 44 strips. You can certainly use some good fabric scissors but it will definitely take much, much longer!

rotary cutter for fabric strips

Notice that I didn’t bother pressing the fabric. I didn’t see the point. I like the super ragged look with the fraying and strings and wrinkles — that’s what makes this tutu so dang cute, right?

pile of batik strips

After cutting allllll of my strips, I quickly stitched the elastic together on my machine (going back and forth several times for stability and to lock in my thread). Forgive me, for I failed to photograph this part, but I didn’t even pin it. I Just overlapped the two ends and sewed it with a zigzag. I took the elastic off the machine…

legs1

..and stuck my legs through to have a “base” to work off of, because who has a child’s sized dress form? Not me….. and yes, that’s a piece of washi tape on my shoe!

Following the tutorial’s knotting instructions I began attaching my strips one by one after deciding my pattern/order of prints. legs2

The idea being that you want to keep the front, or right side of the fabric facing outward on the tutu. You will get fuzzy so have a lint roller handy!

legs3

It starts to look really cool once you get several of the strips tied on. legs4

Before you know it, you’re done! I was surprised by the weight of the tutu, but if you think about how much a fat quarter bundle weighs, it makes sense!

Fabric Tutu Tutorial

Here is a closeup of the knots – you can see the imperfect fabric cuts, the frays and jagged edges…. I just love it!

tutuclose

This was a lot of fun and I was able to get the whole tutu done in one afternoon naptime!

fabrictutu2

So go forth and do! This is one of the projects that I decided to dive into after reading that book I mentioned in my last post… it really inspired me. Just get out there and create, people!

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DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

DIY No Sew Sweater RECYCLE!

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle In honor of Earth Day, I bring you the ultimate sweater recycle!

Do you have an old sweater that has lost it’s shape, or has a hole in it, or was from your maternity days, or you like it but you don’t LOVE it so you never wear it? Bring it out of the closet and grab your fabric scissors because you’re about to get some really good use out of it! Literally, you can leave no scrap behind as you cut and re-use your sweater in 4 ways (5 if you count the one I thought of after the fact!).

Here we go — in pictoral form! Enjoy!

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Cut torso out of sweater, save that little scrap at the bottom!

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Stretch out the ends so they roll

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Voila! Infinity Scarf. Oh but we’re not done yet…

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Cut off the sleeves

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Arm Sleeves! No? Well then how about…

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Bootcuffs! Like this…

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Yes! But wait.. there’s more!

 

DIY No Sew Sweater Recycle

Mini Crop! Pair with a tank and some boyfriend jeans. Super Cute.

You’re Welcome. 🙂

Oh and that one thing I thought of after the fact, that little scrap from the bottom? Use it as a headband or wrap it around your pony tail. Boom!

XOXO, D

Handy InfoGraphic for Pinning Right HERE: sweaterrecycle

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Pillow Cover Tutorial

Envelope Pillow Cover Tutorial

I have all of this beautiful fabric from Zazzle to play with now (read about it, here!), so my creative juices are definitely bubbling! I think it’s the months and months and months of not having any free time or willpower (or sanity) to make things that has my creative brain screaming for some activity. Oh, babies.Pillow Cover Tutorial - Close Up

I really like the cotton twill fabric — it’s perfect for totes, clutches, curtains, pillows and other home decor items. But seriously, PILLOWS! I do love me some pillows, as they are the quickest and easiest way to change up your decor and bring a fresh new look into your room. Want some color? A pillow here, a pillow there and POW! Whole new house.

Thus, my Stickelberry friends, I present to you, the easiest way to make a removable (and washable) cover for a pillow! This is an easy project, perfect for beginners!

Pillow Cover Tutorial - SuppliesSupply List

  • Pillow (mine is 18×18)
  • Fabric — This tutorial uses one long piece, 19×44. Adjust as necessary to your pillow size, allowing an extra inch on the short side and double the length + (plus) 8-10 inches. (You can purchase the fabric I used, here!)
  • Thread – will show on the back so coordinate the color if you want
  • Scissors & Pins

A few notes before you start…

*I like a loose cover on my pillows so I can smash them — if you like a tighter fit, simply up your seam allowance on all sides and cut off the excess. You can also go back and round the corners if you don’t like them pointy.

**If you DO plan on washing your covers eventually, then DO pre-wash your fabric, please! Otherwise you may not be able to shove that pillow back in again.

1. Start by laying your fabric out, right side down, and placing your pillow in the center. I’ve folded one edge to the middle so you can see..if you fold both sides over the pillow, they will overlap significantly since you added 8-10 inches to the length. This is a good thing. Pillow Cover Tutorial

2. After centering your pillow on the fabric, you’re going to fold the left edge in an inch

Fold Edge

Fold edge in one inch

3. Then fold again and pin.

Fold again and pin

Fold again and pin

4. Repeat on the right side, fold in an inch, fold again and pin.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Fold Edge Twice and Pin

Fold other edge in twice and pin

5. Take the fabric to the machine and sew down each edge, back-stitching a few times at the top and bottom. Use whatever seam allowance you’d like as long as you’re locking in the fold.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Sew down folded edge

Sew down the folded edge

6. Doesn’t that look nice? Now Go do it on the other side, too.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Sewn Edge

Pretty Pretty Sewn Edge

7. After both edges are sewn, lay out your fabric again, but this time right-side up.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Pleace Pillow on Fabric right side up

Lay fabric down, right side up and center pillow again

8. Fold both edges over so they overlap and the fabric is as tight as you want it around the pillow, and pin at the top and bottom.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Fold Over

Fold edges over pillow, they should overlap

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Pin at Overlap

Pin at overlap on both of the raw edges

9. Slide the pillow out and re-pin to include the bottom layer of fabric that was under the pillow.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Slide Pillow Out, Re-Pin

Slide pillow out and re-pin both edge to include bottom layer of fabric

10. Back to the machine! Start at the top and sew all the way down to the bottom, pausing for some back-stitching where the overlap is along the way. I’ve placed my hand where the overlap is — be sure to sew all of the layers together.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Sew Down Raw Edge

Sew all the way down raw edges, back-stitching where the overlap is to reinforce it

11. Repeat on the other side, remember to back-stitch where the overlap is to reinforce.

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Sew 2nd Raw Edge

Sew down the other side as well

12. Inside-Out Envelope!

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Inside Out

Sewing Complete!

13. Turn your pocket of goodness right side out, use your poker of choice to poke out the corners (I totally use chopsticks).

Pillow Cover Tutorial - turn right side out

Turn your happy little cover right side out!

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Sewing Complete

Happy pillow cover!

14. Press

Pillow Cover Tutorial - Press

Press the cover – get the wrinkles out

15. Shove your pillow in!

Pillow Cover Tutorial

Happy pillow in the happy pillow cover!

That’s it — pretty easy right?

Pillow Cover Tutorial

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