Tag Archives: girl

DIY Fabric Tutu

DIY Fabric Tutu

First of all, let me say I can’t take credit for this one, I saw  this pin on Pinterest, and I nearly died. THE CUTENESS!!!!

Now, you know I don’t have a girl, this is an all boy house, but I’ve been dying to make some girly things lately…. and it just so happened that one of my bestie’s daughters was turning 5.

So the timing was just perfect.

I had to do it.

tutu2

I followed the tutorial behind that pin from Create Kids Couture

She has it all figured out by age — how much elastic to cut, how many fabric strips and how long they need to be. SO EASY! Kudos and thanks to this gal for figuring it all out for us.

Since my giftee was turning 5, I cut a 20″ piece of knit elastic (3/4″ found here), and I went with  44 3×23 inch strips of these gorgeous batik prints I’ve been hanging on to for a special occasion.

batik prints

They were in a fat quarter bundle I purchased years ago, similar to these here. Confession: I bought the Batman shirt first because I’m a total nerd and decided to match the fabric to the shirt. Lucky lucky me, I had these batiks stashed away that matched just perfectly!

rotary cutter for fabric strips

For my own sanity, I used a rotary cutter to cut all 44 strips. You can certainly use some good fabric scissors but it will definitely take much, much longer!

rotary cutter for fabric strips

Notice that I didn’t bother pressing the fabric. I didn’t see the point. I like the super ragged look with the fraying and strings and wrinkles — that’s what makes this tutu so dang cute, right?

pile of batik strips

After cutting allllll of my strips, I quickly stitched the elastic together on my machine (going back and forth several times for stability and to lock in my thread). Forgive me, for I failed to photograph this part, but I didn’t even pin it. I Just overlapped the two ends and sewed it with a zigzag. I took the elastic off the machine…

legs1

..and stuck my legs through to have a “base” to work off of, because who has a child’s sized dress form? Not me….. and yes, that’s a piece of washi tape on my shoe!

Following the tutorial’s knotting instructions I began attaching my strips one by one after deciding my pattern/order of prints. legs2

The idea being that you want to keep the front, or right side of the fabric facing outward on the tutu. You will get fuzzy so have a lint roller handy!

legs3

It starts to look really cool once you get several of the strips tied on. legs4

Before you know it, you’re done! I was surprised by the weight of the tutu, but if you think about how much a fat quarter bundle weighs, it makes sense!

Fabric Tutu Tutorial

Here is a closeup of the knots – you can see the imperfect fabric cuts, the frays and jagged edges…. I just love it!

tutuclose

This was a lot of fun and I was able to get the whole tutu done in one afternoon naptime!

fabrictutu2

So go forth and do! This is one of the projects that I decided to dive into after reading that book I mentioned in my last post… it really inspired me. Just get out there and create, people!

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Sew Easy Placemat Clutch

Sew Easy Placemat Clutch

When you really get into sewing, you start to see fabric everywhere. Seriously. Everywhere. I don’t get rid of clothes anymore if the fabric is sew-worthy, as evidenced by my upcycle/recycle/refashion posts! But now I can’t even go through the grocery store without eyeing the tiny section of kitchen towels that are in the baking aisle.

And Target? FUHGHETTABOUDIT. Towels, kitchen towels, napkins, shower curtains, sheets, placemats, table runners…. there is fabric everywhere, and lots of super cute prints, too!

Guess how this tutorial came about? Yep. Walking by the kitchen linen aisle and spotted this GORGEOUS placemat.

Placemat Clutch

I mean seriously, it is so beautiful and has such great texture.

Placemat Clutch

I ended up buying two – one in this coral color and another in a lovely mustard for a later project!

So anyway, this placemat happens to be lined (bonus!) which made my mind start shouting ideas at me in a tourette-like fashion: BAG! Pillow. Coasters. CLUTCH!  Ah, yes, I think a clutch is perfect.

I wanted to make a very stiff, structured clutch – not the floppy kind (I feel like stuff would fall out of a floppy clutch, but you can skip this step if you want a floppy one for yourself), so in lieu of interfacing I used stiffened felt.

Placemat Clutch - Stiffened Felt

WHAT, you say? Stiffened felt. I love this stuff and I use it all the time! The placemat is 14×19 and a sheet of the stiffened felt is 12×18 so it fits perfectly inside. You can get it at your local craft store, or by all means, use some interfacing that is stiff if you want more structure to your clutch.

You’ll also need some velcro. There are several kinds of velcro, and truth be told I would have preferred sew-on velcro instead of the kind with the sticky back (gums up the needle!) but you use what you have on hand sometimes… so if you’re going to get supplies, get sew-on velcro instead of sticky! 🙂

Placemat Clutch - Velcro

So now the fun begins. Slice open one of the short ends of the placemat…

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Stuff the felt inside…

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Push it all the way in, there will be a little room on all sides.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Set your machine to a zigzag stitch…

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

..and sew that baby back up! Be sure to go back and forth a few times at the top and bottom to seal off the thread. You won’t sew through the felt since it is shorter than the placemat.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Now isn’t that lovely? Hold up the placemat and shake it around a bit so the felt makes it back to the center.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Next you’re going to fold your very stiff placemat into a clutch. Get ready, you’ll need some muscle.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

You can fold it to where you want it, what looks good or feels comfortable to you, but if you’re a stickler for measurements (I am NOT), I measured for you and folded up to leave 4.5 inches on the top flap, as you can see pictured here:

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

I put pins to mark my place and went back to the sewing machine. Using a straight stitch, I started at the pin and went straight down to the bottom. Since the placemat is lined and you have the felt in there, your machine and needle will basically tell you where to sew and give you your seam allowance – it’s about 1/4 -1/2 inch. Be sure to go back and forth a few times at the top and bottom again, to secure your thread.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

This fabric hides your thread & seam so nicely!

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Now go sew up the other side, too..

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

..and check your work out — you now have a lovely pocket!

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Next step: use your muscles to fold that top down. Press it really well, it’s going to want to pop back up on you. I set my laptop on mine for a while just to tell it who is boss.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

This is where the velcro comes in. AGAIN – I want to reiterate that sew-on velcro is much preferred over the sticky-back velcro I am using here. Trust me. I went through 2 needles!

Pick your spot where you want the velcro placed and pin it in place.

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

I joined the velcro once pinned and folded the top of my clutch over to get my spot for the second piece on the main body of the clutch like this..

Placemat Clutch - Make it!Placemat Clutch - Make it!… and then secured the second piece of velcro.

Break out your needle and thread and sew those puppies on!

Placemat Clutch - Make it!

Be sure to go through the placemat and the felt or interfacing if you used it — you’ll want it to be secure and not to pull away from the structure of the clutch. I used a contrasting thread, I thought it would be cute!

Placemat Clutch - Make It!Since I used the sticky-back velcro, I had to use all my power to push the needle through. But the end result was worth the sore thumb muscles!

Placemat Clutch - Make It!Once you’ve sewn both pieces of velcro on..

Placemat Clutch - Make It!You’re done!

Placemat Clutch - Finished!Isn’t she pretty? Dramatic, but still so very classy!

Placemat Clutch - Finished! Makes a great gift, too – and they will be SUPER impressed when you tell them you made it yourself! 😉

Happy Sewing!

Sew Easy Placemat Clutch

 

 

 

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DIY Nursery Mobile

DIY Paper Nursery Mobile

An affordable and easy project for baby’s room!

What would Baby #2’s room be without some crafty goodness from Mama? Due in early May, I have less than 10 weeks to go, so the pressure is ON! I have to get his room ready for him so it’s nice and cute and Stickelberry-like.

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I made a mobile for Logan’s room the last time I was pregnant following this tutorial here that I found in Parents magazine, and while it did turn out cute, I found the process very awkward and had to re-do it several times to get it to hang right. Even still to this day the center hoop is off center and the whole thing is just slightly imbalanced. That bugs. The strands also fell off several times (thank goodness I didn’t hang it above the crib), so I ultimately re-attached each one using thick sticky dots. Here is a picture of Logan’s mobile – his room theme is Sock Monkeys!

So, I decided to come up with my own plan… for Baby #2’s room, the theme is a little more contemporary and simple, so I wanted a simplified mobile. Fewer stands, fewer circles…

Simplified Mobile

Simplified Mobile

I hit my local Michaels for the supplies and decided that instead of using the embroidery hoops, I would use a squared wooden dowel — well, two dowels, criss-crossed (I cut a long one in half).

Squared Wooden Dowel..err...Stick?

Squared Wooden Dowel..err…Stick?

I picked out the paper I wanted to use in my nursery room’s colors (White, Grey, Navy, Orange), and some jump rings and went home and got to work. Since I do have a decent selection of craft tools and had made one of these mobiles before, I already had some of the other basic supplies: 2″ hole punch, keychain ring, thin wire, exacto knife, thread, mini pliers.

Supplies

Supplies

Of course I had to throw in some bling — I just adore the silver glittered checkerboard card stock I found in the scrapbook paper aisle! The Navy has a nice sheen to it too – it’s quite beautiful.

Paper and Card stock in Baby's Color Scheme

Paper and Card stock in Baby’s Color Scheme

I started typing up a summary of how I made this ting, but it was a little wordy…. so it’s better to explain with pictures! 🙂

I hope baby likes it!

DIY: Paper Mobile Tutorial

Supplies:IMG_6691

  • Scrapbook Paper or Card stock — I used 1 12×12 piece for each color except the orange scrapbook paper and the silver glittery card stock. I used 2 pieces for those because they are not double sided. Depending on the colors/paper you choose, plan accordingly as you’ll need to punch out extra circles and glue them to the backs of the ones that aren’t double sided.IMG_6731
  • Jump Rings — found in the jewelry aisle. Mine are 9mm and came in a package of 85 pieces. I have many leftover but I couldn’t find a smaller package.
  • 1 Key Chain Ring — also in the jewelry aisle. I had a pack of them from other projects.
  • Tape Runner– I used my favorite one, Elmers! You could also use regular glue, sticky dots or your other paper adhesive of choice.
  • 36″ Squared wooden dowel/stick — these come in a variety of sizes. Choose one that suits your style!IMG_6694
  • Thin Wire, Thread, Yarn, Shoelace… whatever you want to use to attached the dowels together, attach the strands to the dowels, and to hang from the center. This isn’t an exact science – be creative and use what works for you!
  • Tools — 2″ hole punch, Exacto knife, pliers, hole punch (mine is 1/8″); again you don’t have to use the EXACT same tools as I do!

I measured the dowel and marked the halfway point (18″), then measured and marked where I wanted to hang the strands (every 3″), marking an ‘x’ where the two dowels would cross each other.

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Measure out where you will cut the dowel, where the two pieces will cross, and where you will hang the strands

I used the exacto knife to cut the dowel (the wood is very thin and pliable).

IMG_6692

Nice, clean cut from the exacto knife

Nice, clean cut from the exacto knife

I then used the exacto knife to notch out the center of the dowels where they would cross so they fit together like a puzzle piece.

IMG_6698IMG_6700I made a groove at each marking for the strands as well so that the wire I used to secure them would sit nicely and not move.

IMG_6696Next, I put the dowels together and used a piece of the wire to secure the two pieces …my piece was about 8″.IMG_6701

Dowel pieces secured using notch and wire.

Dowel pieces secured using notch and wire.

Now on to the fun part — punching circles!

Punch Therapy

Punch Therapy

Woops – be careful not to do this 🙂IMG_6737

*ONE IMPORTANT NOTE: If you use scrapbook paper or single-sided card stock, depending on your color scheme or preference, you may want to punch two circles for each one that isn’t double sided — otherwise it will be white. That may or may not matter to you… it did to me so I used a tape runner (Elmer’s is my favorite) to glue two circles together for the orange and silver circles.

 

Glue two circles together to make them double sided if needed

Glue two circles together to make them double sided if needed

Once you have all your circles punched out, play around with your pattern or sequence for your strands. You can have them all the same (important if you’re doing a rainbow or ombre theme!), but I decided to have one dowel with one pattern, and the other with a different pattern, so it was mixed up a little.

IMG_6716 IMG_6717

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And now for some more fun… punching holes!

More Punch Therapy

More Punch Therapy

My hole punch is 1/8″ – you can use whatever size you like, but make sure not to go too far in to the circle, otherwise your jump ring won’t have enough room. I went in about 1/8″ from each end of the circle. IMG_6730Have I mentioned I LOVE anything that glitters?

So pretty...

So pretty…

*CRAFT BONUS: Confetti!IMG_6727

Now comes the labor intensive part. Attaching the jump rings. It isn’t difficult, it just takes time. You can use pliers if you need to, but I found it was quicker and easier to just use my fingers – I found the jump rings pretty easy to bend and put that together.

IMG_6735Link up all of your strands – be sure to put one at the very top of each strand, and no need to put one at the bottom!

IMG_6733

All linked up

Now, to attach the strands to the mobile – cut a piece of wire for each strand. I cut mine about 1/2″ in length.

IMG_6739Next, simply loop the wire through the top jump ring, and wrap it around the dowel, nesting it into the groove that you carved for it earlier. Repeat for each strand.

IMG_6742

Loop the wire through the jump ring and wrap it around the dowel

Loop the wire through the jump ring and wrap it around the dowel, nesting it into the groove

Almost finished! This part I forgot to take a picture of (sorry!) but you can see how it is put together in the next picture…

IMG_6780Take the keychain ring and connect it to the crossed wire in the center of the two dowels. Then connect a jump ring to the keychain ring, so you have the dowels hanging from the two rings. Take your string or ribbon or fishing line or shoelace (whatever you’re using) and loop it through the jump ring. This will allow your mobile to spin nicely and keep it from turning lopsided.

IMG_6779

Connect keychain ring to crossed wire, then connect a jump ring to the keychain ring and loop your hanging material of choice through it

I tied my string in a knot and hung it from one of these bad boys..IMG_6764And here it is, hanging in the nursery (to be revealed later!)

Finished!

Finished!

That’s it! Not too bad, right? Definitely worth the effort for a super cute homemade mobile for your little one..

XOXO, D

 

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Answer to a Challenge: Embellished Onesie & Tutorial

A Crafty Challenge? Yipeee!!

A Crafty Challenge? Yipeee!!

Earlier this week I sent this picture out to the social world, accepting the crafty challenge that had been given to me. Inside one of the cutest baby shower invites ever, there was a plain white teeny tiny little baby onesie with that tag on it that you see in the picture over there. It wanted me to decorate it. I thought to myself, I would feel bad if I let it down, leaving it to a life of plain old whiteness, with no color or pizazz…or cuteness. So I looked at my stash of crafty supplies and got to work! I don’t know that it is prize-worthy but I think any little girl would look just adorable in it, especially in one of those newborn photos with her on her tummy and her lil’ butt sticking up in the air.

Onesie Front

Hearts on Front

Onesie Back

Flowers on Butt

Onesie

Trying to Show Both.. ?

In case you weren’t aware, I love pink and black together (see my logo?). In fact, I’m wearing pink and black right now. It’s fun, funky and sweet at the same time. It’s girly with a little kick. Since I love the combo so much, I tend to gravitate toward crafty notions with those colors, hence the ribbons and flowers I ended up using for this project. This was all done by hand – no sewing machine required – and I was able to pull it off in one naptime session, including the time it took to take a billion pictures while I was working.

Of course there are a bazillion ways to embellish a onesie – there is no “right” way. Just add something cute in some crafty manner to it, and voila! This is just one way that you can make a plain old onesie cute with a few supplies, and without major sewing skills. You can use any colors, you can use any flowers, you can use just the ribbons or just the flowers.. whatever makes your heart sing. And you can use the ribbon hearts and the fabric flowers to embellish so many other things, too – so I’m hoping this inspires someone to do something.

Headband

Flower Headband

I had an extra flower left, so I made a matching headband too. Come on, can’t you see how cute that big old flower would be sticking out on a bitty baby’s tiny little head? Let’s all say it together, “aaaawwwwwwwwwwe!”

 

So let’s get this party started… here is how I did it!

Supplies:

supplies

The Stuff You Need

 

  • Plain Baby Onesie
  • Two lengths of ribbon for hearts, cut to 9″
  • Fabric Flowers (I used three)
  • Coordinating thread
  • Sewing Needle
  • Pins
  • Fray Check*

*Fray Check is a handy dandy little liquid product that you can use to treat the ends of ribbon and fabric so that they don’t fray on you and unravel or get frizzy. It basically glues the edge shut. If you use it, be sure to let it dry before proceeding.

First Step – Make the Hearts!

This is an easy way to twist the ribbon to make a cute heart, and as I mentioned before, you can use them on anything you like. The oh-so-pretty pattern in the background of some of these shots is actually my ironing board cover (grins). I like to pin on it because it is squishy and holds my pins nicely. At this point I’ve already treated the ends of the ribbon using the Fray Check.

1. Fold Up

1. Fold Up

2. Fold down and Pin

2. Fold down and Pin

3. Fold to left and Pin down

3. Fold to left and Pin down

 

 

 

 

 

1.Lay the first piece of ribbon vertically, and fold the bottom half up.

2. Bend the right half about 1/2 an inch from the fold, and place a pin on the first fold to hold it in place.

3. Take the tail and twist to the left to make another bend, and place another pin.

IMG_5206

4. Repeat on other side

IMG_5203

Second heart

4. Repeat the same steps with the other ribbon tail to make the other side of the heart and join it with the bottom pin. Ta Da! There is your heart!

If you’re making more than one, follow the same process as many times as your heart desires (chuckles).

IMG_5216

5. Press

5. To make this easier on myself, I pressed the hearts for a few seconds, so that the folds would firm up and not disappear when I went to place the hearts on the onesie. After pressing, you are ready to sew the heart on to the onesie!

 

 

Step Two – Sewing The Hearts on the Onesie

Pin

1. Place & Pin

 

1. Place and pin the hearts to the onesie so they don’t lose their shape, then thread your needle with the thread that coordinates with your ribbon. I did the pink one first.

 

 

 

IMG_5221

2. Start from inside onesie

IMG_5222

Start at base of heart

2. Starting from the INSIDE of the onesie, poke your needle through the base of the heart, where the two ends of the ribbon cross over (right below the pin). Pull your needle and thread through, and then go back through the ribbon to the inside of the onesie to make a stitch.

 

IMG_5226

3. Stitch an ‘x’ at the base

 

3. Repeat, to make an ‘x’ at the base of the heart, which will hold the bottom of it in place. You can then remove the bottom pin.

 

 

6. Continue to Stitch around the heart

4. Stitch around the heart

4. Continue to stitch (in and out) up the length of the ribbon and around the whole heart. Don’t worry about it being perfectly spaced and whatnot, this has a “shabby chic” feel to it, so the handmade look is what you’re going for! Plus the thread color should blend nicely with the ribbon.

 

 

 

& Trim

& Trim

IMG_5232

Knot thread ends

5. When you get down to the base where you started, tie off the threads together on the inside of the onesie, and trim the tail close to the knot.

 

 

Two sewn hearts

Two sewn hearts

 

 

Now your heart is complete! Repeat for your remaining hearts to embellish the front of your onesie.

 

 

 

 

Step Three – Adding the Fabric Flowers to the Rear

This part is easy too, especially if you use the Jolee’s Fabric Flowers that I am using, because they have a sticky back that is helpful to hold the flower in place on the fabric. No need to pin! These wonderful embellishments can be used on so many different things, which I’ve gone on and on about in a previous post.

 

Stick!

Stick!

1. Peel &

1. Peel &

1. Decide where you want to place your flowers, peel off the backs, and stick them on the back of the onesie.

 

 

 

2. Start under felt circle

2. Start under felt circle

2. Thread your needle with the coordinating thread for the flower, and start sewing on the underside of the felt circle, in between the flower and the onsie. This just makes it cleaner – I tucked the tail under the felt circle as I sewed around it.

 

 

IMG_5240

3. Sew through circle

3. Pull needle through top and then sew back down through the circle, pushing through the top of the onesie to the inside.

Then stitch, going from the inside of the onesie, up through the felt circle and back down, in and out, all the way around the circle/flower. Sometimes it might be tough to push through – they adhere the fabric to the circle with glue – so try poking around until you find a soft spot.

Simply knot the thread on the top of the circle and trim the tail when you’re done (not pictured), and repeat for the remaining flowers. IMG_5244

I told you it was easy to sew these on, even if you’ve never sewn a stitch! I used the same process to sew the remaining flower on to a plain black baby headband as well.

 

So there you have it — now we have our adorable little onesie in all it’s pink and black cuteness. I hope I get to see baby girl dressed in it!

Onesie and Matching Headband -- Challenge Answered!

Onesie and Matching Headband — Challenge Answered!

 

 

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